Half Scale Bombé Chest

$6,800.00

The kettle-shaped
bombé form (the term is derived from the French word for
bulge) is characterized by the swelling of the lower half of the
carcase ends and front, with the swell returning to a normalvsize base. This shape is, I think, directly related to English
pieces such as the Apthorp chest-on-chest, which was imported to Boston before 1758 and is now at that city’s Museum
of Fine Arts. Bombé was popular in England for only 10 to
12 years, but remained the vogue in Boston for nearly 60 years.
In America, the carcase ends were always shaped from
thick, solid planks of mahogany. In Europe, the ballooning
case ends were most often coopered—3-in. to 4-in. pieces of
wood were sawn to shape, glued up, contoured and then veneered. Instead of veneering, the Americans worked with solid wood. I think the magnificent grain patterns of this shaped
mahogany are a major attribute of Boston furniture. The
bombé form

Hand carved to half the scale. The original is on display in the Boston Arts Museum.

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The kettle-shaped
bombé form (the term is derived from the French word for
bulge) is characterized by the swelling of the lower half of the
carcase ends and front, with the swell returning to a normalsize base. This shape is, possibly directly related to English
pieces such as the Apthorp chest-on-chest, which was imported to Boston before 1758 and is now at that city’s Museum
of Fine Arts. Bombé was popular in England for only 10 to
12 years, but remained the vogue in Boston for nearly 60 years.
In America, the carcase ends were always shaped from
thick, solid planks of mahogany. In Europe, the ballooning
case ends were most often coopered—3-in. to 4-in. pieces of
wood were sawn to shape, glued up, contoured and then veneered. Instead of veneering, the Americans worked with solid wood. I think the magnificent grain patterns of this shaped
mahogany are a major attribute of Boston furniture.